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Skateboard buying guide


Shredding down the street, sliding just inches off the ground on four speedy wheels — that’s why skateboarding is one of the most popular sports in the world. It’s easy to get started. All you need is the right board. Here’s how to pick one.

The Gear Guy is currently researching new models and writing an update to this article. Watch for his updated tips and reviews in the June 2016 issue of Boys’ Life.


The type of skateboard you choose depends on the kind of skating you plan on doing. There are three main styles of boards: street, park/ramp and longboards.

The first two types are similar but with different sizes of wheels. Longboards are — you guessed it — longer and better for cruising and making big, wide turns.

To help you pick the right skateboard, here are the ins and outs of shopping for a new board.


If you’re going out to buy a skateboard you should go to your local skate shop. The local shop will have a wider variety of boards and the salespoeple are more knowledgeable about skating than at sporting goods or department stores.

At the skate shop, they’ll just ask you what you want and if you don’t know, they’ll tell you what’s good.


Sure, you can get a skateboard for $35, but you’ll be getting a board that’s heavy and that’s not going to be very fast. If you want to get a good street board it’ll be in the range of $100 to $180.

That’s the price for a “complete” or, in other words, a board that’s already put together for you. As you get more advanced you’ll probably want to buy the parts individually and put together your own board.


Besides being heavier, slower and less durable, cheap skateboards can be dangerous — parts can break and cause wipeouts. If you’re planning to just tool around the neighborhood, a cheap board may be fine. But if you’ll be skating a lot and you’re looking to learn tricks, it’s worth investing in a quality board.


Most skateboard decks are make of seven layers of plywood glued together. All decks are similar, with the same shape, a length of 31 to 32.5 inches and a width of 7.5 to 8 inches. Smaller boards are better for tricks, wider boards are easier to carve in ramps. The big difference is graphics.

Most decks cost $50 to $60.


The axles that hold your wheels to the board are called trucks. They let you turn the board, and they are the surface you grind on for tricks like rail slides. All trucks are similar, though some are lighter or more durable.

You can make a truck work however you want to make them work. Tighten the trucks for flip tricks, loosen them for carving. Expect to pay $30 to $50 for a pair of trucks.


The single most important part of your board is the set of wheels. Wheel size is measured in millimeters, and the bigger the wheel the faster you’ll go. For street skating, try 49 mm to 54 mm wheels. For ramps and pools, stick with 58 mm to 62 mm.

The other thing to keep in mind is the durometer, or hardness, of the wheel. The softer the wheel the more forgiving it is. For instance, E.G. Fratantaro, Team Manager for Sector 9 Skateboards, says a durometer of 78A to 87A is best for rough surfaces with rocks and cracks; a 97A or higher is better for smooth surfaces like ramps and skate parks. Dual-durometer wheels combine a hard center and soft outer edges for all-around performance.

You’ll spend $25 to $40 for a set of four wheels. The total for your do-it-yourself board: $105 to $150.


Add these to your skateboarding shopping list (and always wear them):

  • Helmet
  • Elbow pads
  • Knee pads

10 Comments on Skateboard buying guide

  1. ALWAYS WEAR PADS!!! It is important to wear a helmet and knee pads because I have wiped out once without any pads and that hurt!

  2. Coool!!!

  3. I buy my boards at zumies

  4. jdjkshdjasdh // August 14, 2008 at 9:24 pm // Reply

    are world industries boards pro or not

  5. i just go to zumiez

  6. SPARKEY225 // July 28, 2008 at 8:08 am // Reply


  7. I started with a walmart board, then when to get complete, then a customized. Get good griptape such as mob, and fast bearings, such as bones which are okay. Get hard wheels if you skate street, huge wheels for vert, and freestyle I don’t know. Tight trucks for vert (ramps and bowls). Start with tight trucks and as you get better you can loosen it to your liken. It will be harder to land tricks, untill you get use to it, pivots(180’s) will be harder too.

  8. i agree with sk8terhelp PLANB^s my favorite

  9. Plan B, Almost, Zero, Element, and Girl are all great brands. I suggest getting one of those at your local skate shop.

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